"Elizabeth's Field" by Barbara Lockhart

elizabeths_field 1.jpg
elizabeths_field 1.jpg

"Elizabeth's Field" by Barbara Lockhart

18.00

Cover art by Lynne Lockhart

 

Elizabeth's Field is the story of the free black population living on Maryland's Eastern Shore during the pre-Civil War era of the 1850s, in a county noted for the birthplace of Harriet Tubman. The novel explores the relationships between African-Americans, both freed and enslaved, their white protectors and sympathizers, as well as those who were intent on preserving the status quo.

 

Elizabeth, a free woman of Indian and African-American descent, owns land in 1852 and loses it in 1857. Her struggle to hold onto the land and her connection with Sam Green, the local minister who is sentenced to ten years imprisonment for owning a copy of Uncle Tom's Cabin, attest to the turmoil existing within Maryland's borders.

 

The third main character, Mattie, the present day farm worker on whose oral history the novel is based, searches for answers to her genealogical history. As she tells the story of her life, she reveals the societal and agricultural changes that occur on the same land that was Elizabeth's field one hundred and fifty years before.

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